UK ACOPs p2

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List of some UK Approved Codes of Practice for Health and Safety Cont... Page 2


 

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Health and Safety ACOP L43 to ACOP L77

L43 First aid at mines

ACOP L43 First aid at mines. Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations

 

This Approved Code of Practice gives practical advice on the requirements placed on employers and self-employed people by the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 to provide adequate first aid provisions to all mine workers.

 

The Code of Practice has been approved by the Health and Safety Commission with the consent of the Secretary of State under section 16 of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. It gives practical guidance on the requirements placed on employers and self-employed persons by the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 as they now apply to mines and comes into effect on 1 October 1993 which is the date on which the Management and Administration of Safety and Health at Mines Regulations 1993 come into force.

 

L47 The Coal Mines

ACOP L47 The Coal Mines (Owner's Operating Rules) Regulations 1993

 

This booklet outlines the Coal Mines (Owner’s Operating Rules) Regulations 1993 and applies to all coal mines. It looks at different aspects of mine operations such as certain areas of safety, the ventilation of blind ends, mine fires and frictional ignition. The regulations and guidance is aimed at all owners of mines.

 

The Regulations are made under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and apply to all coal mines. The Regulations require the owner of a coal mine to ensure that the mine is not worked unless there are in force owner’s operating rules which are suitable for that mine. 

 

L56 Safety in the installation and use of gas systems and appliances

ACOP L56 Safety in the installation and use of gas systems and appliances

 

The regulations and the HSW Act place responsibilities on a wide range of people, including those installing, servicing, maintaining or repairing gas appliances and other gas fittings as well as suppliers and users of gas, including certain landlords. They cover a wide variety of premises' gas systems and appliances.

 

Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulation deals with the safe installation, maintenance and use of gas systems, including gas fittings, appliances and flues, mainly in domestic and commercial premises, eg offices, shops, public buildings and similar places. The regulations generally apply to any 'gas’ as defined in the Gas Act 1986 (amended by the Gas Act 1995), apart from any gas comprising wholly or mainly of hydrogen when used in non-domestic premises. The requirements therefore include both natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG).

 

L60 Control of substances hazardous to health in the production of pottery

ACOP L60 Control of substances hazardous to health in the production of pottery

 

This Approved Code of Practice - also known as the ‘Potteries ACOP’ - looks at aspects of health and safety in the production of pottery bodies, glazes and colours, and the manufacture of lithographic and other transfers for use in the decoration of pottery.

 

It is aimed at all people who work in pottery production who are exposed, or who might be exposed, to substances hazardous to health.

 

This Approved Code of Practice applies where persons are exposed, or are liable to be exposed, to substances hazardous to health in the production of pottery, the preparation of raw materials for use in, and production of, pottery bodies, glazes and colours, and the manufacture of lithographic and other transfers for use in the decoration of pottery.

 

This Code is intended as an amplification of certain aspects of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, the Approved Codes of Practice (ACOPs) under the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1994 as amended (COSHH), the Control of Lead at Work Regulations 1998 (CLAW) (update Control of Lead at Work Regulations 2002) and the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992. All four codes are concerned with the correct matching of the precautions to the risk and should be treated as complementary.

 

L65 Prevention of fire and explosion, and emergency response on offshore installations

ACOP L65 Prevention of fire and explosion, and emergency response on offshore installations

 

It is aimed at all those who own, operate or work on offshore installations and looks at how to prevent fires and explosions as well as how to protect people working on offshore installations should they occur. It also looks at how to respond to emergencies, considering issues such as escape, evacuation, rescue and recovery.

 

The book deals specifically with the prevention of fire and explosions on offshore installations and how to protect people on them should such an incident occur, including emergency response arrangements for evacuation, escape, rescue and recovery. The Regulations, ACOP and guidance deal with:

 

(a) preventing fires and explosions, and protecting people from the effects of any which do occur;

 

(b) securing effective response to emergencies affecting people on the installation or engaged in activities in connection with it, and which have the potential to require evacuation, escape and rescue.

 

L70 A guide to the Offshore Installations and Pipeline Works

ACOP L70 A guide to the Offshore Installations and Pipeline Works (Management and Administration) Regulations 1995 (Second edition)

 

This booklet gives guidance on the Offshore Installations and Pipeline Works (Management and Administration) Regulations (MAR), which came into force on 20 June 1995.

 

It explains the main provisions of the Regulations to assist installation operators, installation owners, employers, managers, safety representatives, safety committee members and others involved with offshore activities.

 

L72 A guide to the Borehole Sites and Operations

ACOP L72 A guide to the Borehole Sites and Operations Regulations 1995. Guidance on Regulations

 

This book contains the full text of the Boreholes Sites and Operations Regulations 1995 together with accompanying guidance concerning the minimum requirements for improving the safety and health protection of workers in the mineral extraction industries through drilling. It has been prepared after widespread consultation with industry and provides guidance for management and specialists in the oil/gas, mining and quarrying industries.

 

In addition to the oil, gas and other mineral extraction industries, it applies to the drilling, for example, of boreholes inside a mining area, for proving quarry and opencast reserves, for the extraction or disposal of water, extraction of landfill gas, civil engineering, geophysical exploration and geotechnical investigation. The Regulations do not apply to offshore installations or activities carried out from an offshore installation.

 

This second edition expands the scope of the guidance (to cover boreholes used for the storage of gas in natural strata reservoirs where oil, gas etc have previously been extracted) and updates references to other regulations and publications.

 

L74  First aid at work

ACOP L74  First aid at work. The Health and safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981

 

This guidance is for employers. It sets out what you need to do to address first-aid provision in the workplace.

 

It provides guidance on:

 

managing the provision of first aid (first-aid kit, equipment, rooms etc); requirements and training for first-aiders;

requirements for appointed persons;

making employees aware of first-aid arrangements;

first aid and the self-employed;

cases where first-aid regulations do not apply.

L77 Guidance from the licensing authority on the Adventure Activities

ACOP L77 Guidance from the licensing authority on the Adventure Activities Licensing Regulations 2004. The Activity Centres (Young Person's Safety) Act 1995

 

This book outlines the adventure activities licensing scheme, gives guidance on safety standards and on the licensing authority’s functions and the approaches it will adopt in its dealings with providers and the public.

 

The aim of the licensing scheme is to give assurance that good safety management practice is being followed so that young people can continue to have opportunities to experience exciting and stimulating activities outdoors.

 

Much of the material in this book was issued in 1996 but the legal position changed when the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) was designated as Adventure Activities Licensing Authority (AALA) from 1 April 2007. Other changes include adopting the lessons learned in the previous years of operation; and clarifying areas that have caused confusion. The technical content has been fully updated where required.

 

The following activities are within the scope of the scheme:

 

caving (underground exploration in natural caves and mines including potholing, cave diving and mine exploration, but not in those principally used as show-places open to the public);

climbing (climbing, traversing, abseiling and scrambling activities except on purpose-designed climbing walls or abseiling towers);

trekking (walking, running, pony trekking, mountain biking, off-piste skiing and related activities when done in moor- or mountain-country above 600 metres and which is remote, ie over 30 minutes travelling time from the nearest road or refuge);

watersports (canoeing, rafting, sailing and related activities when done on the sea, tidal waters or larger non-placid inland waters). 

 

 

Note on ACOPs from the HSE

 

HSE guidance legal status

 

This guidance is issued by the Health and Safety Executive. Following the guidance is not compulsory, unless specifically stated, and you are free to take other action. But if you do follow the guidance you will normally be doing enough to comply with the law. Health and safety inspectors seek to secure compliance with the law and may refer to this guidance.

 

Approved Codes of Practice (ACOPs) legal status

 

Each ACOP is approved by the Health and Safety Executive, with the consent of the Secretary of State. It gives practical advice on how to comply with the law. If you follow the advice you will be doing enough to comply with the law in respect of those specific matters on which the Code gives advice. You may use alternative methods to those set out in the Code in order to comply with the law.

 

However, the Code has a special legal status. If you are prosecuted for breach of health and safety law, and it is proved that you did not follow the relevant provisions of the Code, you will need to show that you have complied with the law in some other way or a Court will find you at fault.


On Safe Lines QHSE Software Help file v1.109.0184 : Copyright © 2019 Brian G. Welch MSc(QHSE), NVQ4(OH&S), CMIOSH


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