Health and Safety INDG Industry Guides p2

https://qhse.support

 

FREE QHSE Software Click <HERE> to Learn More


FREE QHSE Business Software Solutions https://onsafelines.com/

FREE Quality, Health and Safety, and HR Business Software Click <HERE> to Learn More and Download

 

THIS SITE CONTAINS NO GOOGLE OR SIMILAR TYPE ADS and NO CLICK BAIT LINKS

 

QHSE Support >(Site Map) Health & Safety Guidance > H&S INDGs - Industry Guides >  


Useful INDG  Health and Safety Guides - page 2


 

Health and Safety Executive

 

INDG  is an Acronym for Industry Guidance

Health and Safety INDG  Industry Guides 214 to 297

INDG 209 (rev2) 05/11 Reducing health risks from the use of ultraviolet (UV) tanning equipment

INDG 214 (rev2) 05/14 First aid at work

INDG 214 (rev1) 10/09 First aid at work

INDG 214 (rev) 10/06 First aid at work

INDG 219 (rev1) 09/11 How offshore helicopter travel is regulated

INDG 220 (rev) 04/03 A guide to The Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) regulations 1996

INDG 223 (rev5) 04/12 Asbestos : A Short Guide to Managing Asbestos in Premises

INDG 223 (rev4) 11/09 Asbestos : A Short Guide to Managing Asbestos in Premises

INDG 223 (rev3) 12/04 Asbestos : A Short Guide to Managing Asbestos in Premises

INDG 225 (rev2) 11/12 Preventing slips and trips at work

INDG 225 (rev1) 03/07 Preventing slips and trips at work

INDG 225 (rev1) 11/03 Preventing slips and trips at work

INDG 229 (rev2) 11/12 Using work equipment safely

INDG 229 (rev1) 01/06 Using work equipment safely

INDG 230 (rev) 11/04 Storing and handling ammonium nitrate

  AMAT Reducing Risks Associated with Ammonium Nitrate

INDG 231 (rev1) 04/12 Electrical safety and you: A brief guide

INDG 231 (rev) 11/05 Electrical safety and you: A brief guide

INDG 232 (rev2) 04/13 Consulting Employees on H&S : A Guide to The Law

INDG 232 (rev1) 09/11 Consulting Employees on H&S : A Guide to The Law

INDG 233 (rev2) 07/15 Preventing contact dermatitis and urticaria at work

INDG 233 (rev1) 03/07 Preventing contact dermatitis and urticaria at work

INDG 236 (rev3) 09/13 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

INDG 236 (rev2) 04/12 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

INDG 236 (rev1) 04/11 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

INDG 236 (rev) 04/04 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

INDG 238 (rev3) 03/09 Gas appliances: Get them checked Keep them safe

INDG 238 (rev2) 10/02 Gas appliances: Get them checked Keep them safe

INDG 240 (rev) 09/11 Don’t mix it: A guide for employers on alcohol at work

INDG 241 (rev1) 10/12 Working safely with agricultural machinery

INDG 241 (rev) 12/05 No second chances

INDG 242 (rev1) 06/05 Vibration : Control Back-pain Risks from Whole-body Vibration

INDG 244 (rev2) 09/11 Workplace Health Safety & Welfare

INDG 244 (rev1) Workplace Health Safety & Welfare

INDG 247 (rev2) 08/17 Electrical safety for entertainers

INDG 247 (rev1) 03/14 Electrical safety for entertainers

INDG 247 (rev) 02/98 Electrical safety for entertainers

INDG 248 (rev2) 09/15 Solder fume and you

INDG 248 (rev) 06/02 Solder fume and you

INDG 249 (rev1) 09/15 Controlling health risks from rosin (colophony)-based solder flux fume

INDG 249 (rev) 05/97 Controlling health risks from rosin (colophony)-based solder flux fume

INDG 253 (rev1) 02/09 Controlling legionella in nursing and residential care homes

INDG 254 (rev1) 08/14 Chemical reaction hazards and the risk of thermal runaway

INDG 258 (rev1) 01/13 Confined spaces

INDG 258 (rev) 09/11 Confined spaces

INDG 258 (rev) 08/03 Confined spaces

INDG 259 (rev1) 08/08 An introduction to health and safety

INDG 259 (rev1) 08/06 An introduction to health and safety

INDG 259 (rev1) 04/03 An introduction to health and safety

INDG 259 (rev) 12/01 An introduction to health and safety

INDG 261 (rev2) 11/12 Pressure systems A brief guide to safety

INDG 261 (rev1) 05/01 Pressure systems A brief guide to safety

INDG 266 (rev2 02/15) Are you involved in a diving project at work

INDG 266 (rev1 08/09) Are you involved in a diving project at work

INDG 269 (rev1 04/13) Managing musculoskeletal disorders in checkout work

INDG 273 - Working with solvents

INDG 275 - Plan, Do, Check, Act - Managing Health & Safety

INDG 277 - Leadership for the major hazard industries

INDG 285 - Landlords: A Guide to Landlords' Duties Gas Safety

INDG 286 - Diesel engine exhaust emissions

INDG 290 - LORER 1998 : A Simple Guide

INDG 291 - PUWER 1998 : A Simple Guide

INDG 293 - Welfare at Work: Guidance for employers on welfare provisions

INDG 296 - Vibration : Hand-arm Vibration

INDG 297 - Safety in gas welding, cutting and similar processes


INDG209 (rev2) 05/11 Reducing health risks from the use of ultraviolet (UV) tanning equipment

INDG 209 (rev2) 05/11 Reducing health risks from the use of ultraviolet (UV) tanning equipment

Introduction

The use of any ultraviolet (UV) tanning equipment (eg sunlamps, sunbeds and tanning booths) may expose staff and will expose customers to UV radiation. UV radiation can cause injuries and ill health either in the short term (eg sunburnt skin or conjunctivitis) or in the long term (eg premature skin ageing, skin cancer and cataracts). Exposure to UV radiation tanning equipment before the age of 35 years significantly increases the risk of several types of skin cancer. Younger people seem to be more at risk from the cancer-causing effects of indoor tanning.

 

HSE considers the advice in this leaflet to reflect good practice for employers operating UV tanning equipment. This leaflet gives advice on how to reduce health risks.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG214 (rev2) 05/14 First aid at work

INDG 214 (rev2) 05/14 First aid at work

This leaflet answers some basic questions about first-aid provision at work.

It is aimed at employers in small and medium-sized workplaces, but may be useful to all employers, managers and others involved in first aid at work.

 

INDG214 (rev1) 10/09 First aid at work

INDG 214 (rev1) 10/09 First aid at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

See original edition description below...

 

INDG214 (rev) 10/06 First aid at work

INDG 214 (rev) 10/06 First aid at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

First aid at work - Your questions answered

This leaflet answers some basic questions about first-aid provision at work.

It is aimed at employers in small and medium-sized enterprises, but may be useful to all employers, managers and others involved in first aid.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG219 (rev1) 09/11 How offshore helicopter travel is regulated

INDG 219 (rev1) 09/11 How offshore helicopter travel is regulated

Safety - the top priority

The helicopter is known as the workhorse of the UK offshore oil and gas industry because it is the primary means of transporting workers to and from installations.

Millions of flights have taken place since the 1960s. The safety record is good, but accidents and fatalities have occurred. There can never be room for complacency with offshore helicopter safety, particularly in the harsh environment in which helicopters operate. That is why the arrangements to ensure the safety of offshore helicopter operations are so important. This leaflet describes those arrangements, and how they are regulated.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG220 (rev) 04/03 A guide to The Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) regulations 1996

INDG 220 (rev) 04/03 A guide to The Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) regulations 1996

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

The Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1996 (CHSW Regulations) are a set of modern and simplified construction regulations, which also include some important new provisions arising from the implementation of an EC Directive on construction (92/57/EEC). These Regulations completed the implementation of the Directive which was started by the introduction of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG223 (rev5) 04/12 Asbestos A Short Guide to Managing Asbestos in Premises

INDG 223 (rev5) 04/12 Asbestos : A Short Guide to Managing Asbestos in Premises

Who is this guidance for?

This guidance is for, anyone who is responsible for maintenance and repairs in a building, which may contain asbestos. The ‘duty to manage' asbestos is included in the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012. You are a ‘dutyholder’ if:

you own the building:

you are responsible through a contract or tenancy agreement:

you have control of the building but no formal contract or agreement; or

in a multi-occupancy building, you are the owner and have taken responsibility for maintenance and repairs for the whole building.

What buildings are affected?

All non-domestic buildings, whatever the type of business.

The common areas of domestic buildings, eg halls, stairwells, if shafts, roof spaces.

All other domestic properties are not affected by the duty to manage.

If you are not the dutyholder but have information about the building, you must co-operate with the dutyholder, eg leaseholders must allow managing agents access for inspection.

 

INDG223 (rev4) 11/09 Asbestos : A Short Guide to Managing Asbestos in Premises

INDG 223 (rev4) 11/09 Asbestos : A Short Guide to Managing Asbestos in Premises

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Who is this guidance for?

If you own, occupy, manage or have responsibilities for non-domestic premises which may contain asbestos, or if you are responsible for the non-private, ie common parts of domestic premises like hall and lift areas in flats, you will either have:

a legal duty to manage the risk from this material; or

a duty to co-operate with whoever manages that risk.

If you have information on the whereabouts of asbestos you will, under the duty of co-operation, be required to make this available to those responsible for managing these risks. The main duty to manage is placed on the person responsible for maintaining the fabric of the non-domestic building or the shared common parts of domestic buildings.

 

This guidance will also be of help to you if you are managing asbestos in the private areas of social domestic premises. It will help you decide how to identify, assess and manage any asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) on your premises. A good strategy to manage these materials will help you prevent risk to workers or others who may use the premises.

 

INDG223 (rev3) 12/04 Asbestos : A Short Guide to Managing Asbestos in Premises

INDG 223 (rev3) 12/04 Asbestos : A Short Guide to Managing Asbestos in Premises

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Who is this guidance for?

If you own, occupy, manage or have responsibilities for non-domestic premises which may contain asbestos, you will either have:

a legal duty to manage the risk from this material; or

a duty to co-operate with whoever manages that risk.

If you have information on the whereabouts of asbestos you will,

under the duty of co-operation, be required to make this available to those responsible for managing these risks.  This guidance will also be of help to you if you are managing

asbestos in domestic premises.

 

It will help you decide how to identify, assess and manage any asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) on your premises. A good strategy to manage these materials will help you prevent risk to workers or others who may use the premises.

 

The guidance (previously called Managing asbestos in premises) will be particularly useful if you have small or less complex premises such as a shop or a farm building. If you have complex and/or many buildings to manage, you may find that A comprehensive guide to managing asbestos (HSG227) will provide the more detailed advice that you need.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG225 (rev2) 11/12 Preventing slips and trips at work

INDG 225 (rev2) 11/12 Preventing slips and trips at work

What is this leaflet about?

Slips and trips are the most common cause of injury at work. On average, they cause 40 per cent of all reported major injuries and can also lead to other types of serious accidents, for example falls from height. Slips and trips are also the most reported injury to members of the public.

 

This leaflet describes measures that employers may need to implement to help prevent slips and trips. It will also be useful to employees and their safety representatives. The solutions are often simple and low-cost.

 

INDG225 (rev1) 03/07 Preventing slips and trips at work

INDG 225 (rev1) 03/07 Preventing slips and trips at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

Over a third of all major injuries reported each year are caused as a result of a slip or trip (the single most common cause of injuries at work). These cost employers over £512 million a year in lost production and other costs. Slips and trips also account for over half of all reported injuries to members of the public.

 

Recognising the importance of slips and trips, the Health and Safety Executive and local authorities have included this topic in their programmes of work designed to achieve national targets set to improve health and safety performance. These targets were published by the Government and the Health and Safety Commission in the Revitalising Health and Safety strategy statement of June 2000.

 

Legal actions brought as a result of an injury can be extremely damaging to business, especially where the public are involved. Insurance covers only a small proportion of the costs.

 

Anyone at work, but particularly employers, can help to reduce slip and trip hazards through good health and safety arrangements.

 

Effective solutions are often simple, cheap and lead to other benefits.

 

INDG225 Preventing slips and trips at work (original edition)

INDG 225 (rev1) 11/03 Preventing slips and trips at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

Over a third of all major injuries reported each year are caused as a result of a slip or trip (the single most common cause of injuries at work). These cost employers over £512 million a year in lost production and other costs.

 

Slips and trips are the most common cause of non-fatal major injuries in both the manufacturing and service sectors and account for over half of all reported injuries to members of the public. Recognising the importance of slips and trips, the Government and the Health and Safety Commission have included this topic as one of eight national priority programmes with new targets set to improve health and safety performance.

These targets were published in the Revitalising Health and Safety strategy statement of June 2000.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG229 (rev2) 11/12 Using work equipment safely

INDG 229 (rev2) 11/12 Using work equipment safely

Introduction

Every year, there are a number of accidents from using work equipment, including machinery. Many are serious and some are fatal.

 

This leaflet explains what you, as an employer, may need to do to eliminate or reduce the risks from work equipment. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

 

It covers all workplaces and situations where the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 applies, including offshore installations. If you are an employer, a manager, a supervisor or hire out equipment for use in the workplace, this leaflet will help you understand what you can do to reduce the chances of an accident happening.

 

For some operations you will need more detailed information. If you wish to build, modify or add equipment (for example to a production line) you will probably need to seek advice from a competent engineer or equivalent person who is aware of the relevant European standards and requirements.

 

If you would like information on the law, or on other publications which give you more guidance on selection, protection measures and the safe use of particular types of machinery or other work equipment, see 'Further information'.

 

INDG229 (rev1) 01/06 Using work equipment safely

INDG 229 (rev1) 01/06 Using work equipment safely

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

Every year, there are a number of accidents from using work equipment, including machinery. Many are serious and some are fatal.

 

This leaflet gives simple, practical advice on what you can do to eliminate or reduce the risks from work equipment. It covers all workplaces and situations where the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 applies, including offshore installations. It is mainly for those who have responsibility (directly or indirectly) for work equipment and how it is used. If you are an employer, a manager, a supervisor or hire out equipment for use in the workplace, this leaflet will help you understand what you can do to reduce the chances of an accident happening.

 

Accidents not only cause human suffering, they also cost money, for example in lost working hours, training temporary staff, insurance premiums, fines and managers’ time. By using safe, well-maintained equipment operated by adequately trained staff, you can help prevent accidents and reduce these personal and financial costs.

 

This leaflet does not give details about the law, but gives practical information about what you should do. For some operations you will need more detailed information. If you wish to build, modify or add equipment (for example to a production line) you will probably need to seek advice from a competent engineer or equivalent person who is aware of the relevant European standards and requirements. If you would like more information on the law, or on other publications which give you more guidance on selection, protection measures and the safe use of particular types of machinery or other work equipment, see the ‘HSE publications’ section.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG230 (rev) 11/04 Storing and handling ammonium nitrate

INDG 230 (rev) 11/04 Storing and handling ammonium nitrate

Introduction

The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 imposes general duties to ensure that workers and others are protected against risks to their health and safety from work activities. This leaflet has therefore been produced to help duty holders to ensure the safe storage and handling of ammonium nitrate at, for example, harbours, merchant stores and manufacturers' premises. The main use of ammonium nitrate is as a fertiliser, marketed either as prills (small spheres) or granules. The different types of ammonium nitrate fertiliser are described at the end of this leaflet.

 

Also see:

AMAT Insights Issue 1 Reducing Risks Associated with Ammonium Nitrate

AMAT Insights Issue 1 Reducing Risks Associated with Ammonium Nitrate

Introduction

Improperly manufactured, transported, handled and stored explosive materials, such as ammonium nitrate, are a safety risk to local communities and a security threat to states and societies.

In this first issue of AMAT Insights, an analysis of major explosions involving ammonium nitrate that have occurred in the last 100 years suggests that mismanaged ammonium nitrate increases the probability that the substance will be exposed to heat and pressure which, in turn, increases the risk of explosion. Ammonium nitrate has the potential to cause catastrophic events involving significant loss of life and property. However, with the implementation of appropriate preventive and mitigative controls, the frequency of these events can be radically reduced and the effects when they do occur, significantly lessened.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG231 (rev1) 04/12 Electrical safety and you: A brief guide (first edition)

INDG 231 (rev1) 04/12 Electrical safety and you: A brief guide

Introduction

Electricity can kill or severely injure people and cause damage to property. Every year many accidents at work involving electric shock or burns are reported to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Most of the fatal incidents are caused by contact with overhead power lines.

 

Even non-fatal shocks can cause severe and permanent injury. For example, shocks from faulty equipment may lead to falls from ladders, scaffolds or other work platforms.

 

Those using or working with electricity may not be the only ones at risk – poor electrical installations and faulty electrical appliances can lead to fire, which may also cause death or injury to others. Most of these accidents can be avoided by careful planning and straightforward precautions.

 

This leaflet provides some basic measures to help you control the risks from your use of electricity at work. Further guidance for particular industries or subjects can be found on HSE’s website (www.hse.gov.uk).

 

INDG231 Electrical safety and you: A brief guide (original edition)

INDG 231 (rev) 11/05 Electrical safety and you: A brief guide

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

Electricity can kill. Each year about 1000 accidents at work involving electric shock or burns are reported to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Around 30 of these are fatal. Most of these fatalities arise from contact with overhead or underground power cables.

 

Even non-fatal shocks can cause severe and permanent injury. Shocks from faulty equipment may lead to falls from ladders, scaffolds or other work platforms. Those using electricity may not be the only ones at risk: poor electrical installations and faulty electrical appliances can lead to fires which may also cause death or injury to others. Most of these accidents can be avoided by careful planning and straightforward precautions.

 

This leaflet outlines basic measures to help you control the risks from your use of electricity at work. More detailed guidance for particular industries or subjects is listed on pages 6 - 8. If in doubt about safety matters or your legal responsibilities, contact your local inspector of health and safety. The telephone number of your local HSE office will be in the phone book under Health and Safety Executive. For premises inspected by local authorities the contact point is likely to be the environmental health department at your local council.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG232 (rev2) 04/13 Consulting Employees on H&S : A Guide to The Law

INDG 232 (rev2) 04/13 Consulting Employees on H&S : A Guide to The Law

Employers have a duty to consult with their employees, or their representatives, on health and safety matters. This leaflet is aimed at employers and discusses what they need to do to ensure they are complying with the law.

 

The law sets out how employees must be consulted in different situations and the different choices employers have to make. There are two different regulations that require employers to consult their workforce about health and safety:

 

>  the Safety Representatives and Safety Committees Regulations 1977 (as amended); and

>  the Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996 (as amended).

 

INDG232 (rev1) 09/11 Consulting Employees on H&S : A Guide to The Law

INDG 232 (rev1) 09/11 Consulting Employees on H&S : A Guide to The Law

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet provides an overview of employers’ duties to consult with their employees or their representatives on health and safety matters.

 

The law sets out how employees must be consulted in different situations and the different choices employers have to make. There are two sets of general regulations about employers’ duty to consult their workforce about health and safety:

the Safety Representatives and Safety Committees Regulations 1977 (as amended);

the Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996 (as amended)

These regulations will apply to most workplaces. Figure 1 shows the relationship between the two sets of regulations and how they affect your workplace. 

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG233 (rev2) 07/15 Preventing contact dermatitis and urticaria at work

INDG 233 (rev2) 07/15 Preventing contact dermatitis and urticaria at work

Introduction

This leaflet explains how you, as an employer, can protect your employees from skin problems known as contact dermatitis and urticaria. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

 

The leaflet will help you identify what tasks and substances may cause harm, and introduces practical steps for controlling the risks. The information it contains will help you comply with the law.

 

INDG233 (rev1) 03/07 Preventing contact dermatitis and urticaria at work

INDG 233 (rev1) 03/07 Preventing contact dermatitis and urticaria at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet tells you about a skin problem that you can get at work – contact dermatitis.

If you are an employer, safety representative, trainer or safety advisor you can influence work practice and prevent this disabling disease.

 

The leaflet shows you what to look out for and how to prevent dermatitis. It also tells you where you can find more detailed practical advice for specific jobs and workplaces.

What is contact dermatitis?

Contact dermatitis is inflammation of the skin caused by contact with a range of materials. These include detergents, toiletries, chemicals and even natural products like foods and water (if contact is prolonged or frequent). It can affect all parts of the body, but it is most common to see the hands affected. There are three main types of contact dermatitis:

irritant contact dermatitis:

allergic contact dermatitis:

contact urticaria.

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG236 (rev3) 09/13 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

INDG 236 (rev3) 09/13 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

Introduction

This leaflet explains the simple and sensible precautions that need to be taken to prevent danger from portable or movable electrical equipment in low-risk environments, such as offices, shops, some parts of hotels and residential care homes.

 

It also provides examples of this sort of equipment to help you decide what you need to do to maintain portable appliances in your workplace.

 

INDG236 (rev2) 04/12 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

INDG 236 (rev2) 04/12 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet explains the simple and sensible precautions that need to be taken to prevent danger from portable or movable electrical equipment in low-risk environments, such as offices, shops, some parts of hotels and residential care homes.

 

It also provides examples of this sort of equipment to help you decide what you need to do to maintain portable appliances in your workplace.

 

INDG236 (rev1) 04/11 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

INDG 236 (rev1) 04/11 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

See original edition description...

 

INDG236 (rev) 04/04 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

INDG 236 (rev) 04/04 Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet sets out the precautions which can be taken to prevent danger from portable electrical equipment in those premises where risks are generally low, eg offices or libraries. The precautions are similar to those for electrical equipment used in other premises, but are matched to low-risk environments.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG238 (rev3) 03/09 Gas appliances: Get them checked Keep them safe

INDG 238 (rev3) 03/09 Gas appliances: Get them checked Keep them safe

The problem

Every year about 14 people die from carbon monoxide poisoning caused by gas appliances and flues which have not been properly installed or maintained.

 

See second edition description below for further details...

 

INDG238 (rev2) 10/02 Gas appliances: Get them checked Keep them safe

INDG 238 (rev2) 10/02 Gas appliances: Get them checked Keep them safe

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

The problem

Every year about 30 people die from carbon monoxide poisoning caused by gas appliances and flues which have not been properly installed or maintained.

 

Many others also suffer ill health. When gas does not burn properly, as with other fuels such as coal, wood or oil, excess carbon monoxide is produced, which is poisonous.

 

You can’t see it. You can’t taste it. You can’t even smell it. But carbon monoxide can kill without warning in just a matter of hours. You are particularly at risk when you are asleep because you cannot recognise the early symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. These include tiredness, drowsiness, headache, nausea, pains in the chest and stomach pains. These symptoms can mimic many common ailments and may easily be confused with flu or simple tiredness.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG240 (rev) 09/11 Don’t mix it: A guide for employers on alcohol at work

INDG 240 (rev) 09/11 Don’t mix it: A guide for employers on alcohol at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

This booklet has been developed to help the owners and managers of small and medium-sized businesses deal with alcohol-related problems at work. It reaffirms the Government’s commitment in The Health of the Nation to encourage employers to introduce workplace alcohol policies and evaluate their impact.

 

Ninety per cent of personnel directors from top UK organisations surveyed in 1994 stated that alcohol consumption was a problem for their organisation. Most regarded alcohol as a fairly minor problem, involving a small number of employees. However, 17% of personnel directors described alcohol consumption as a ‘major problem’ for their organisation. What concerned directors most, in order of priority, was:

loss of productivity and poor performance;

lateness and absenteeism;

safety concerns;

effect on team morale and employee relations;

bad behaviour or poor discipline;

adverse effects on company image and customer relations.

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG241 (rev1) 10/12 Working safely with agricultural machinery

INDG 241 (rev1) 10/12 Working safely with agricultural machinery

Introduction

This leaflet gives advice on how to work safely with mobile and stationary agricultural machinery – particularly when carrying out maintenance and dealing with blockages. See ‘Find out more’ at the end of the leaflet for sources of detailed guidance on working safely with specific types of machines, eg round balers.

 

INDG241 (rev) 12/05 No second chances

INDG 241 (rev) 12/05 No second chances

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

A farm machinery safety step-by-step guide

Over a five-year period, HSE Agricultural Inspectors investigated nearly 7000 accidents. This guide is based on a detailed analysis of over 1000 of these accidents which involved maintenance and blockage clearing.

 

In this booklet you will find practical advice on working with mobile and stationary agricultural machinery – particularly machine maintenance and dealing with blockages.

 

Remember, the time to consider safety is before something goes wrong, not afterwards.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG242 (rev1) 06/05 Vibration Control Back-pain Risks from Whole-body Vibration

INDG 242 (rev1) 06/05 Vibration : Control Back-pain Risks from Whole-body Vibration

Who should read this leaflet?

You should read this leaflet if you employ operators of off-road mobile machinery, agricultural vehicles or industrial trucks.

 

You may also find it helpful if:

you employ drivers of other vehicles, particularly if they suffer from back pain;

you are a driver or operator of a mobile machine or vehicle;

you are a trade union safety representative or an employee representative for drivers or operators.

This leaflet will help you manage the risk of back pain in your employees and will tell you what you need to do to comply with the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005.

 

Most people who drive road-going vehicles at work are not likely to experience high levels of whole-body vibration and so their employers are unlikely to have to take any action under these Regulations.

 

Also see:

 

HSE Information Sheet:

Whole-body vibration in quarries

This information sheet outlines the risk of developing back pain from whole-body vibration (WBV) in quarrying and explains what you can do to reduce exposure to it. It should be read in conjunction with INDG 242 (rev1) Control back-pain risks from whole 1 body vibration. 

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG244 (rev2) 09/11 Workplace Health Safety and Welfare

INDG 244 (rev2) 09/11 Workplace Health Safety & Welfare

Introduction

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 cover a wide range of basic health, safety and welfare issues and apply to most workplaces (with the exception of those workplaces involving construction work on construction sites, those in or on a ship, or those below ground at a mine). They are amended by the Quarries Regulations 1999, the Health and Safety (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2002, the Work at Height Regulations 2005, and the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015.

 

Employers have a general duty under section 2 of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of their employees at work. People in control of non-domestic premises have a duty (under section 4 of the Act) towards people who are not their employees but use their premises. The Regulations expand on these duties and are intended to protect the health and safety of everyone in the workplace, and ensure that adequate welfare facilities are provided for people at work.

 

INDG244 (rev1) Workplace Health Safety & Welfare

INDG 244 (rev1) Workplace Health Safety & Welfare

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 cover a wide range of basic health, safety and welfare issues and apply to most workplaces (with the exception of those workplaces involving construction work on construction sites, those in or on a ship, or those below ground at a mine). They are amended by the

Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1996, the Health and Safety (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2002, and the Work at Height Regulations 2005.

This leaflet gives a brief outline of the requirements of the Workplace Regulations.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG247 (rev2) 08/17 Electrical safety for entertainers

INDG 247 (rev2) 08/17 Electrical safety for entertainers

Who is this leaflet aimed at?

If you are an entertainer who uses electrical equipment for sound, lighting or other effects, this leaflet is for you. Others who use electrical equipment in the course of their work, such as wardrobe or scenic artists, may also find this guidance useful. It sets out basic measures you can take to help control the electrical risks from use of such equipment.

 

This revised version brings the content up to date and includes:

changes to legislation and links to further guidance;

updates to reflect current working practices, equipment and terminology.

INDG247 (rev1) 03/14 Electrical safety for entertainers

INDG 247 (rev1) 03/14 Electrical safety for entertainers

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Who is this leaflet aimed at?

If you are an entertainer who uses electrical equipment for sound, lighting or other effects, this leaflet is for you. It sets out basic measures you can take to help control the electrical risks from use of such equipment. As well as guidance for your safety, there are some notes at the end about the law.

Introduction

Electric shocks can kill

Entertainers have been injured and even killed from electric shocks while performing or practising. Make sure your next performance is not your last.

 

Even a very small electric current flowing through your body can kill you. 50 milliamps (a 40 watt light bulb only takes about 150 mA) can cause pain, paralysis of chest muscles and, after a few seconds, upset the heartbeat and cause death (Figure 1).

 

The higher the current, the more dangerous and quicker the effects.

 

INDG247 (rev) 02/98 Electrical safety for entertainers

INDG 247 (rev) 02/98 Electrical safety for entertainers

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Who is this leaflet aimed at?

See description for first edition above...

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG248 (rev2) 09/15 Solder fume and you

INDG 248 (rev2) 09/15 Solder fume and you

This guidance is aimed at people who solder using rosin, specifically colophony-based solder flux, which can cause asthma and dermatitis.

 

INDG248 (rev) 06/02 Solder fume and you

INDG 248 (rev) 06/02 Solder fume and you

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet tells you about possible health hazards from solder fume when using flux materials containing rosin, sometimes known as colophony. It also explains what your employer has to do and the precautions you should take.

 

It deals only with the risks arising from exposure to rosin-based or modified rosin-based solder fluxes

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG249 (rev1) 09/15 Health and Safety Executive Controlling health risks from rosin (colophony)-based solder flux fume

INDG 249 (rev1) 09/15 Controlling health risks from rosin (colophony)-based solder flux fume

Introduction

This leaflet gives guidance on how to protect your employees from the risk of ill health caused by rosin (colophony)-based solder flux fume at work. It will help you to understand how to comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH) (see Need to know more?).

 

It is aimed at employers but will also be useful to employees, their safety representatives and health and safety professionals.

 

INDG249 (rev) 05/97 Health and Safety Executive Controlling health risks from rosin (colophony)-based solder flux fume

INDG 249 (rev) 05/97 Controlling health risks from rosin (colophony)-based solder flux fume

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

Serious health problems may arise from inhalation of fume from rosin (sometimes called 'colophony') or its derivatives (see page 6) contained in solder fluxes. This booklet is concerned only with risks from rosin and its derivatives in solder flux, and not other risks which may arise during soldering. It is aimed at managers of businesses using these fluxes; suppliers of fluxes; and those who supply, use and maintain fume control equipment for soldering work. A separate leaflet, Solder fume and you, explains the potential health risks and precautions for people using these fluxes.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG253 (rev1) 02/09 Controlling legionella in nursing and residential care homes

INDG 253 (rev1) 02/09 Controlling legionella in nursing and residential care homes

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet is intended to help you control risks from legionella and is based on existing HSE guidance. One way of controlling legionella is to keep water hot, which you are probably doing for other reasons already. Hot water brings a risk of scalding which you must also control.

 

The leaflet focuses on risks from hot and cold water systems. If you have cooling towers or other water systems, such as whirlpool baths or hydrotherapy pools, that could also spread legionella, you must consider these as part of your risk assessment.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG254 (rev 1) 08/14 Chemical reaction hazards and the risk of thermal runaway

INDG 254 (rev1) 08/14 Chemical reaction hazards and the risk of thermal runaway

Introduction

A chemical reaction that goes out of control and runs away can create a serious  incident with the risk of injury to people and damage to property and the

environment.

 

This leaflet:

identifies the main hazards of carrying out chemical reactions;

provides guidance on how you can ensure a safe operation; and

identifies some sources of further information and guidance.

The advice is aimed at small and medium-sized companies in the chemical manufacturing industry, although the A chemical reaction that goes out of control and runs away can create a serious principles apply equally to all firms.

 

You must assess the risks of your chemical processes but this does not need to be time-consuming or expensive. You should then ensure that the systems in place reduce the risk of runaway to a level that is as low as reasonably practicable. The effort you take to do this should reflect the complexity of the process and the scale of risks involved

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG258 (rev1) 01/13 Confined spaces

INDG 258 (rev1) 01/13 Confined spaces

Introduction

This leaflet explains what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees when working in confined spaces. It will also be useful to the self-employed or employees and their representatives. The leaflet will help you take the necessary action to meet the requirements of the Confined Spaces Regulations 1997.

What is a confined space?

It can be any space of an enclosed nature where there is a risk of death or serious injury from hazardous substances or dangerous conditions (eg lack of oxygen).

 

Some confined spaces are fairly easy to identify, eg enclosures with limited openings:

storage tanks;

silos;

reaction vessels;

enclosed drains;

sewers.

Others may be less obvious, but can be equally dangerous, for example:

open-topped chambers;

vats;

combustion chambers in furnaces etc;

ductwork;

unventilated or poorly ventilated rooms.

INDG258 (rev) 09/11 Confined spaces

INDG 258 (rev) 09/11 Confined spaces

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This document is aimed at employers and the self-employed who carry out work in confined spaces, and forms part of HSE’s commitment to make simple and practical guidance available for small firms. It will help them take the necessary action to meet the requirements of the Confined Spaces Regulations 1997. It will also be a useful source of information to anyone involved in carrying out work in confined paces.

Confined spaces can be deadly

A number of people are killed or seriously injured in confined spaces each year in the UK. This happens in a wide range of industries, from those involving complex plant to simple storage vessels. Those killed include not only people working in the confined space but those who try to rescue them without proper training and equipment

 

INDG258 (rev) 08/03 Confined spaces

INDG 258 (rev) 08/03 Confined spaces

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet is aimed at employers and the self-employed who carry out work in confined spaces, and forms part of HSE’s commitment to make simple and practical guidance available for small firms. It will help them take the necessary action to meet the requirements of the Confined Spaces Regulations 1997. It will also be a useful source of information to anyone involved in carrying out work in confined spaces.

Confined spaces can be deadly

On average, work in confined spaces kills 15 people every year in the UK across a wide range of industries, from those involving complex plant through to simple storage vessels. In addition, a number of people are seriously injured. Those killed include not only people working in the confined space but those who try to rescue them without proper training and equipment.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG259 (rev1) 08/08 An introduction to health and safety

INDG 259 (rev1) 08/08 An introduction to health and safety

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Health and safety in small businesses: What you should know about where to get more information

It's your business but we can help you look after it!

Getting hurt at work or becoming ill through work is not a pleasant subject to think about. The reality is that over 200 people a year lose their lives at work in Britain. In addition, around 150 000 non-fatal injuries are reported each year, and an estimated 2 million suffer from ill health caused or made worse by work.

 

The mistake is to believe that these things happen in highly unusual or exceptional circumstances that never occur in your workplace. This is not the case. Some basic thinking and acting beforehand could usually have prevented these things from happening.

 

Implementing health and safety measures doesn't have to be expensive, time consuming or complicated. In fact, safer and more efficient working practices can often save money but, more importantly, they can help to save lives.

 

This booklet shows you the kind of things which cause the more common accidents and harm to people’s health. It lets you see what applies to your work activities, and tells you how you can get more help and information.

 

This is especially important if you are in charge of work activities, eg you are an employer, because you have legal responsibilities.

 

INDG259 (rev1) 08/06 An introduction to health and safety

INDG 259 (rev1) 08/06 An introduction to health and safety

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

It’s your business but we can help you look after it!

Getting hurt at work or becoming ill through work is not a pleasant subject to think about. The reality is that over 200 people a year lose their lives at work in Britain. In addition, around 150,000 non-fatal injuries are reported each year, and an estimated 2 million suffer from ill health caused or made worse by work.

 

INDG259 (rev1) 04/03 An introduction to health and safety

INDG 259 (rev1) 04/03 An introduction to health and safety

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

It’s your business but we can help you look after it!

Getting hurt at work or becoming ill through work is not a pleasant subject to think about. The reality is that 250 people a year lose their lives at work in Britain. In addition, around 156,000 non-fatal injuries are reported each year, and an estimated 2.3 million suffer from ill health caused or made worse by work.

 

INDG259 (rev) 12/01 An introduction to health and safety

INDG 259 (rev) 12/01 An introduction to health and safety

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

It’s YOUR business – so look after it!

Getting hurt at work is not a pleasant subject to think about. The reality is that 300 people a year lose their lives at work in Britain. In addition, around 158,000 non-fatal injuries are reported each year, and an estimated 2.2 million suffer from ill health caused or made worse by work.

 

No matter where you work, this booklet summarises the key common areas of risk at work and tells you how you can find out more to ensure that work is made safe.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG261 (rev2) 11/12 Pressure systems A brief guide to safety

INDG 261 (rev2) 11/12 Pressure systems A brief guide to safety

Introduction

If pressure equipment fails in use, it can seriously injure or kill people nearby and cause serious damage to property.

 

This leaflet describes what employers need to do to minimise the risks when working with systems or equipment which contain a liquid or gas under pressure. It will also be useful to employees and their safety representatives.

 

As an employer or self-employed person, you have a duty to provide a safe workplace and safe work equipment. Designers, manufacturers, suppliers, installers, users and owners also have duties.

 

The leaflet does not cover gas cylinders (now called transportable pressure receptacles or transportable pressure vessels), or tanks and tank containers.

 

INDG 261 (rev1) 05/01 Pressure systems A brief guide to safety

INDG 261 (rev1) 05/01 Pressure systems A brief guide to safety

Introduction

If pressure equipment fails in use, it can seriously injure or kill people nearby and cause serious damage to property. Each year in Great Britain, there are about 150 dangerous occurrences involving such unintentional releases. Around six of these result in fatal or serious injury.

 

This leaflet advises you how to minimise the risks when working with systems or equipment which contain a liquid or gas under pressure. It does not cover gas cylinders (now called transportable pressure receptacles or transportable pressure vessels), or tanks and tank containers.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG266 (rev2 02/15) Are you involved in a diving project at work

INDG 266 (rev2 02/15) Are you involved in a diving project at work?

Introduction

This leaflet is for anyone who is involved in a diving project including: clients who place contracts for diving projects;

contractors, divers and supervisors undertaking diving projects;

other people, such as vessel operators, whose actions and activities could affect the safety of the dive team.

 

It explains, in simple terms, the main legal responsibilities of all these groups. You can find more detailed information and guidance on planning and undertaking a diving project in the Diving at Work Regulations 1997 (DWR), and in the relevant Approved Codes of Practice.

 

INDG 266 (rev1 08/09) Are you involved in a diving project at work

INDG 266 (rev1 08/09) Are you involved in a diving project at work?

Introduction

This leaflet is for anyone who is involved in a diving project including:

 

clients who place contracts for diving projects;

contractors, divers and supervisors undertaking diving projects;

other people, such as vessel operators, whose actions and activities could affect the safety of the dive team.

 

It explains, in simple terms, the main legal responsibilities of all these groups. You can find more detailed information and guidance on planning and undertaking a diving project in the Diving at Work Regulations 1997 (DWR), and in the relevant Approved Codes of Practice (see ‘Further information’ towards the end of the leaflet).

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG269 (rev1 04/13) Managing musculoskeletal disorders in checkout work

INDG 269 (rev1 04/13) Managing musculoskeletal disorders in checkout work

What is this leaflet about?

This leaflet will help employers manage checkout work at point of sale and reduce the risk of their workers suffering from musculoskeletal disorders.

 

Working at a point of sale in a busy store can lead to aches and pains. If these are not dealt with they can cause more serious ill health.

 

The retail industry employs over 3 million people, around 10% of the working population, and a significant percentage of this workforce is in an age group considered particularly vulnerable to MSDs.

What are MSDs?

The term MSD covers any injury, damage or disorder of the joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves or other soft tissues in the upper/lower limbs or the back.

 

The common symptom is pain but other symptoms may include discomfort, tingling, numbness, stiffness or swelling. Most MSD symptoms will clear up without any need of medical attention. More information is available at www.hse.gov.uk/msd.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG273 Working with solvents

INDG 273 - Working with solvents

Introduction

This leaflet is aimed at employees who are exposed to solvents at work. It gives important advice about the precautions that employees and their employers should take to avoid risks to the health of workers who use solvents and products that contain solvents.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG275 Plan, Do, Check, Act - Managing Health and Safety

INDG 275 - Plan, Do, Check, Act - Managing Health & Safety

This leaflet is for those who need to put in place or oversee their organisation’s health and safety arrangements. The advice may also help workers and their representatives, as well as health and safety practitioners and training providers.

 

It’s a brief guide to help you comply with the law, and summarises the more detailed guidance in Managing for health and safety (HSG65)

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG277 Leadership for the major hazard industries

INDG 277 - Leadership for the major hazard industries

Introduction

This booklet was originally designed for the offshore industry, but it has been revised by the Hazardous Installations Directorate of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to help industry leaders further improve the health and safety performance of all major hazard industries, both on and offshore.

 

In the booklet we refer to ‘senior managers’. By this we mean executive directors and other managers reporting to board members whose position and responsibilities have the potential for significant impact on the health and safety performance of a business.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG285 Landlords: A Guide to Landlords' Duties Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998

INDG 285 - Landlords: A Guide to Landlords' Duties Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998

This leaflet is aimed at landlords and explains some of the main requirements of the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 as amended by the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2018. It also gives guidance on how to comply with them (see boxed text). The leaflet will also be of interest to tenants, making them aware of landlords’ duties.

 

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG286 Diesel engine exhaust emissions

INDG 286 - Diesel engine exhaust emissions

Diesel engine exhaust emissions have the potential to cause a range of health problems. This leaflet is a short guide for employees to the hazards posed by the emissions, and describes the precautions that employers and individuals can take.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG290 LORER 1998 : A Simple Guide

INDG 290 - LORER 1998 : A Simple Guide

This leaflet provides general information about the requirements of the Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER). It describes what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees in the workplace. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG291 PUWER 1998 : A Simple Guide

INDG 291 - PUWER 1998 : A Simple Guide

This leaflet provides an outline of the requirements of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER) and describes what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees in the workplace. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.  

Do the Regulations apply to me?

 

If you are an employer or self-employed person and you provide equipment for use at work, or if you have control of the use of equipment, then the Regulations will apply to you.

 

They do not apply to equipment used by the public, for example compressed-air equipment used in a garage forecourt. 

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG293 Welfare at Work: Guidance for employers on welfare provisions

INDG 293 - Welfare at Work: Guidance for employers on welfare provisions

If you employ anyone (however short the period) you must ‘so far as is reasonably practicable’, provide adequate and appropriate welfare facilities for them while they are at work. This means you must provide such facilities unless it is clearly unreasonable in terms of time, trouble, cost and physical difficulty.

 

‘Welfare facilities’ are those that are necessary for the well-being of your employees, such as washing, toilet, rest and changing facilities, and somewhere clean to eat and drink during breaks.

 

This leaflet gives you simple, practical advice on how you can meet these requirements. The information may also be of interest to employees and the self-employed.

 

It summarises the requirements of the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG296 Vibration Hand-arm Vibration

INDG 296 - Vibration : Hand-arm Vibration

This pocket card is aimed at people who use handheld powered work equipment or workpieces which vibrate while being processed by powered machinery, such as pedestal grinders. 

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


INDG297 Safety in gas welding, cutting and similar processes

INDG 297 - Safety in gas welding, cutting and similar processes

This leaflet is for people who use compressed gases for welding, hot cutting and similar processes. It describes the hazards associated with portable oxy/fuel gas equipment and the precautions for avoiding injury and damage to property.

Introduction

Oxy/fuel gas equipment has many uses - welding, cutting, heating, straightening, and descaling. The equipment is versatile, easy to move and cheap. It is so widely used that sometimes people forget about the dangers. Many people are injured each year by the incorrect or careless use of oxy/fuel gas equipment. Some people die. This leaflet describes the hazards associated with portable oxy/fuel gas equipment and the precautions for avoiding injury and damage to property.

 

(Back to page index

(Back to INDG main index)


 


Help file v1.175.0619 : Copyright © 2024 Brian G. Welch MSc(QHSE), NVQ4(OH&S), CMIOSH - Supported by Website On Safe Lines