Health and Safety INDG Industry Guides p1

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Useful INDG Health and Safety Guides - page 1


 

Health and Safety Executive

 

INDG is an abbreviation of Industry Guidance

Health and Safety INDG Industry Guides 36 to 199

Health & Safety Law - What you should know

INDG 36 (rev4) 04/13 DSE : Working with VDU's

INDG 36 (rev3) 12/06 DSE : Working with VDU's

INDG 36 (rev2) 06/03 DSE : Working with VDU's

INDG 68 (rev) 06/02 Do you use a steam / water pressure cleaner

INDG 69 (rev) 04/06 Violence at Work

INDG 69 (rev) 05/04 Violence at Work

INDG 73 (rev4) 03/20 Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working

INDG 73 (rev3) 05/13 Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working

INDG 73 (rev2) 09/09 Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working)

INDG 73 (rev) 05/02 Working Alone in Safety

INDG 84 (rev1) 02/12 Leptospirosis: Are You At Risk

INDG 90 (rev3) 03/13 Ergonomics and human factors

INDG 90 (rev2) 02/07 Understanding ergonomics at work 

INDG 91 (rev2) 06/04 Drug Misuse at Work: A Guide of Employers

INDG 119 (rev1) 01/04 Safety representatives and safety committees

INDG 125 (rev3) 05/12 Safe working with bales in agriculture

INDG 125 (rev2) 06/06 Safe working with bales in agriculture

INDG 136 (rev5) 10/12 Working with substances hazardous to health

INDG 136 (rev4) 06/09 Working with substances hazardous to health

INDG 136 (rev3) 04/05 COSHH: A brief guide to the Regulations

INDG 136 (rev2) 10/03 COSHH: A brief guide to the Regulations

INDG 136 (rev1) 07/02 COSHH: A brief guide to the Regulations

INDG 139 (rev1) 07/11 Using electric storage batteries safely

INDG 139 (rev1) 05/06 Using electric storage batteries safely

INDG 140 (rev1) 05/13 Control of exposure to grain dus

  EH44 - Dust in the workplace General principles of protection

INDG 141 (rev1) 02/99 Reporting incidents of exposure to pesticides and veterinary medicines

INDG 143 (rev4) 01/20 Manual Handling

INDG 143 (rev3) 11/12 Manual handling at work

INDG 143 (rev2) 04/06 Getting to grips with manual handling

INDG 143 (rev1) 07/00 Getting to grips with manual handling

INDG 145 (rev) 02/07 Watch your back

INDG 145 (rev) 09/11 Watch your back

INDG 147 (rev) 07/19 Keep your top on

INDG 147 (rev) 03/07 Keep your top on

INDG 148 (rev) 03/02 Reversing Vehicles

INDG 163 (rev4) 08/14 Risk Assessment a brief guide

INDG 163 (rev3) 06/11 Risk Assessment a brief guide

INDG 163 (rev2) 06/06 Risk Assessment a brief guide

INDG 163 (rev1) 07/03 Risk Assessment a brief guide

INDG 171 (rev3) 01/20 Managing upper limb disorders in the workplace

INDG 171 (rev2) 08/13 Managing upper limb disorders in the workplace

INDG 171 (rev1) 02/03 Aching arms (or RSI) in small businesses

INDG 171 (rev1) 12/05 reprinted Aching arms (or RSI) in small businesses

INDG 172 (rev1) 06/12 Breathe easy

INDG 174 (rev2) 06/13 Personal protective equipment (PPE) at work

INDG 174 (rev1) 09/03 Personal protective equipment (PPE) at work

INDG 175 (rev3) 11/12 Vibration : Control the Risks from Hand-arm Vibration

INDG 175 (rev2) 06/05 Vibration : Control the Risks from Hand-arm Vibration

INDG 175 (rev1) 08/03 Health risks form hand-arm vibration

INDG 177 (rev2) 11/13 Gamekeeping and deer farming

INDG 177 (rev1) 05/02 Gamekeeping and deer farming

INDG 178 (rev2) 11/12 Written schemes of examination

INDG 178 (rev1) 02/02 Written schemes of examination

INDG 185 (rev3) 01/13 Using tractors safely

INDG 185 (rev2) 10/09 Using tractors safely

  HSENI 12/21 Using Tractors Safely

INDG 189 (rev1) 09/11 Safety zones around oil and gas installations in waters around the UK

INDG 197 (rev1) 10/03 Working with sewage - The health hazards: A guide for employees

INDG 198 (rev) 09/11 Working with sewage - The health hazards: A guide for employers

INDG 199 (rev2) 05/13 Workplace transport safety

INDG 199 (rev1) 11/05 Workplace transport safety

INDG 199 (rev1) 05/02 Managing vehicles safely at the workplace


Health and Safety Law - What you should know

Health & Safety Law - What you should know

All workers have a right to work in places where risks to their health and safety are properly controlled. Health and safety is about stopping you getting hurt at work or ill through work. Your employer is responsible for health and safety, but you must help.

 

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INDG36 (rev4) 04/13 - DSE : Working with VDU's

INDG 36 (rev4) 04/13 DSE : Working with VDU's

This leaflet will help you to comply with the Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 and explains what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees from any risks associated with Display Screen Equipment (DSE) (ie computers and laptops). It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

 

INDG36 (rev3) 12/06 - DSE : Working with VDU's

INDG 36 (rev3) 12/06 DSE : Working with VDU's

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet is a guide for people who work with visual display units (VDUs), and their

employers. It:

 

>  answers questions that are most often asked about VDUs and health (see page 1);

>  gives a summary of the law on VDU work (the Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992), and outlines what employers and employees should do to comply (see page 4);

>  suggests some simple adjustments that users can make to workstations and screens to make them more comfortable and easy to use (see page 5); and

>  explains how employers and users can get further advice (see page 7).

 

INDG36 (rev2) 06/03 - DSE : Working with VDU's

INDG 36 (rev2) 06/03 DSE : Working with VDU's

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

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INDG68 (rev) 06/02 Do you use a steam / water pressure cleaner

INDG 68 (rev) 06/02 Do you use a steam / water pressure cleaner

INFORMATION AND TRAINING

Companies who supply or hire out cleaners should provide enough information for operators to use them safely. Also, your employer should make sure that you are trained to use the equipment safely, and to understand the safe system of work.

 

The future availability and accuracy of the references listed in this publication cannot be guaranteed.

 

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INDG69 (rev) 04/06 Violence at Work

INDG 69 (rev) 04/06 Violence at Work

People who deal directly with the public may face aggressive or violent behaviour. They may be sworn at, threatened or even attacked.

 

This document gives practical advice to help you find out if violence is a problem for your employees, and if it is, how to tackle it. The advice is aimed at employers, but should also interest employees and safety  representatives.

 

INDG69 (rev) 05/04 Violence at Work

INDG 69 (rev) 05/04 Violence at Work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

 

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INDG73 (rev4) 03/20 Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working

INDG 73 (rev4) 03/20 Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working

This leaflet provides guidance on how to keep lone workers healthy and safe. It is aimed at anyone who employs or engages lone workers, and also at self-employed people who work alone.

 

Following the guidance in the leaflet is not compulsory, but it should help employers understand what they need to do to comply with their legal duties towards lone workers under:

 

>  the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974;

>  the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

Is it legal to work alone and is it safe?

Working alone is not in itself against the law and it will often be safe to do so. However, the law requires employers to consider carefully, and then deal with, any health and safety risks for people working alone.  

 

INDG73 (rev3) 05/13 Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working

INDG 73 (rev3) 05/13 Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

see INDG 73 rev4 description above

 

 

INDG73 (rev2) 09/09 Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working

INDG 73 (rev2) 09/09 Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet provides advice and guidance on how to keep lone workers healthy and safe. It is aimed at anyone who employs or engages lone workers, and may help self-employed people who work alone themselves.

 

Following the advice and guidance in the leaflet is not compulsory, but it should help dutyholders decide what they need to do to comply with their legal duties towards lone workers under:

 

>  the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974;

>  the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

 

INDG73 (rev) 05/02 Working Alone in Safety

INDG 73 (rev) 05/02 Working Alone in Safety

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Controlling the risks of solitary work

Is it legal to work alone and is it safe? The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is frequently asked these questions. There is no single answer; it will depend on the findings of risk assessment but often the answer will be yes. This leaflet will help anyone who employs or engages lone workers. The leaflet gives general guidance on work

 

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INDG84 (rev1) 02/12 Leptospirosis: Are You At Risk?

INDG 84 (rev1) 02/12 Leptospirosis: Are You At Risk?

What is leptospirosis?

Two types of leptospirosis infection can affect workers in the UK.

 

Weil’s disease: This is a serious and sometimes fatal infection that is transmitted to humans by contact with urine from infected rats.

 

The Hardjo form of leptospirosis: This is transmitted from cattle to humans.

 

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INDG90 - Ergonomics and human factors (third edition)

INDG 90 (rev3) 03/13 Ergonomics and human factors

 

This leaflet is aimed at employers, managers and others and will help you understand ergonomics and human factors in the workplace. It gives some examples of ergonomics problems and simple, effective advice about how to solve them.

 

You may have heard the term ‘ergonomics’. In some industries, such as major hazards, defence and transport, ergonomics is also called ‘human factors’. This leaflet helps to explain how applying ergonomics can improve health and safety in your workplace.

 

Ergonomics is a science concerned with the ‘fit’ between people and their work. It puts people first, taking account of their capabilities and limitations. Ergonomics aims to make sure that tasks, equipment, information and the environment fit each worker.

 

INDG90 (rev2) 02/07 Understanding ergonomics at work

INDG 90 (rev2) 02/07 Understanding ergonomics at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

Reduce accidents and ill health and increase productivity by fitting the task to the worker

Understanding ergonomics at work

You may have heard of the term ‘ergonomics’. This is sometimes referred to as ‘human factors’. Not everyone really understands what ergonomics is, what it does, or how it affects people. This leaflet will help to answer these questions and to explain how understanding ergonomics can improve health and safety in your workplace.

 

It is aimed at anyone who has a duty to maintain and improve health and safety and who wants to gain insight into ergonomics. It gives some examples of ergonomics problems and simple, effective advice on what can be done to solve them.

 

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INDG91 (rev2) 06/04 Drug Misuse at Work: A Guide of Employers

INDG 91 (rev2) 06/04 Drug Misuse at Work: A Guide of Employers

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

This booklet has been developed by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the Home Office, the Department of Health, the Scottish Executive, the Health Education Board for Scotland, the National Assembly for Wales, the Health and Safety Executive Northern Ireland and other organisations. It will help owners and managers of businesses and other organisations, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises, deal with drug-related problems at work.

 

It provides a basic understanding of the signs, effects and risks of drug misuse. It also sets out a best practice approach to dealing with drug-related problems at work.

 

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INDG119 (rev1) 01/04 Safety representatives and safety committees

INDG 119 (rev1) 01/04 Safety representatives and safety committees

Safety representatives and safety committees on Offshore Installations

The Regulations give safety representatives certain powers to enable them to fulfil their functions.The Regulations also require the duty holder to arrange training in those aspects of the safety representative’s functions which are considered reasonable.

 

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INDG125 (rev3) 05/12 Safe working with bales in agriculture

INDG 125 (rev3) 05/12 Safe working with bales in agriculture

Who is this leaflet for?

This guidance is for people involved with the handling and stacking of round and square bales. It does not address the safety risks associated with the use of machinery used to produce bales – see 'Find out more'.

 

Following the guidance in this leaflet could help prevent many of the accidents and much of the ill health associated with the handling and stacking of bales in agriculture.

 

INDG125 (rev2) 06/06 Safe working with bales in agriculture

INDG 125 (rev2) 06/06 Safe working with bales in agriculture

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

How could this leaflet help you?

Following the guidance in this leaflet could help prevent many of the accidents and much of the ill health associated with working with bales in agriculture. It may also help with any other problems associated with bales, such as fire, vandalism or access to your land by members of the public.

 

Accidents and ill health

Accidents linked with handling and stacking bales include:

>  people falling from bales or from the vehicles and machinery used in stacking bales;

>  bales falling onto people;

>  electrocution from work carried out on bales stacked near overhead power lines;

>  loose string from bales causing people to trip and fall, or becoming entangled in bale-handling machinery;

>  damage caused by fire, children and young people, vandals, vermin and the weather.

 

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INDG136 (rev5) 10/12 Working with substances hazardous to health

INDG 136 (rev5) 10/12 Working with substances hazardous to health : A Brief Guide to COSHH

This leaflet describes how to control hazardous substances at work, so they do not cause ill health. It will help you understand what you need to do to comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002 (as amended) which apply to the way you work with these substances.

 

This leaflet provides measures that you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees from hazardous substances at work. It will also be useful to employees and their safety representatives.

Why do I need to read this leaflet?

 

Every year, thousands of workers are made ill by hazardous substances, contracting lung disease such as asthma, cancer and skin disease such as dermatitis. These diseases cost many millions of pounds each year to:

 

>  industry, to replace the trained worker;

>  society, in disability allowances and medicines; and

>  individuals, who may lose their jobs.

 

INDG136 (rev4) 06/09 Working with substances hazardous to health

INDG 136 (rev4) 06/09 Working with substances hazardous to health

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

What you need to know about COSHH

Introduction

This leaflet describes how to control hazardous substances at work so that they do not cause ill health. It will help you understand what you need to do to comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002 (as amended) which apply to the way you work with these substances.

 

If you run a small business or are self-employed, you need this information to make sure you are protecting your employees. If you run a medium-sized or large business, where decisions about controlling hazardous substances are more complex, you will also need professional advice. The leaflet will also be useful for trade union and employee health and safety representatives. 

 

INDG136 (rev3) 04/05 COSHH: A brief guide to the Regulations

INDG 136 (rev3) 04/05 COSHH: A brief guide to the Regulations

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

What you need to know about the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH)

 

This leaflet is written mainly for employers to help them to meet their specific duties under COSHH. It will also be useful to safety representatives, health and safety professionals and anyone interested in health and safety issues.

 

INDG136 (rev2) 10/03 COSHH: A brief guide to the Regulations

INDG 136 (rev2) 10/03 COSHH: A brief guide to the Regulations

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Why COSHH matters

Using chemicals or other hazardous substances at work can put people’s health at risk. So the law requires employers to control exposure to hazardous substances to prevent ill health. They have to protect both employees and others who may be exposed by complying with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH).

 

COSHH is a useful tool of good management which sets eight basic measures that employers, and sometimes employees, must take. These are set out in this leaflet in a simple step-by-step approach which will help you to assess risks, implement any measures needed to control exposure and establish good working practices.

 

This leaflet is written mainly for employers to help them to meet their specific duties under COSHH. But it will also be useful to safety representatives, health and safety professionals and anyone interested

in health and safety issues.

 

INDG136 (rev1) 07/02 COSHH: A brief guide to the Regulations

INDG 136 (rev1) 07/02 COSHH: A brief guide to the Regulations

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Why COSHH matters?

Using chemicals or other hazardous substances at work can put people’s health at risk. So the law requires employers to control exposure to hazardous substances to prevent ill health. They have to protect both employees and others who may be exposed by complying with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1999 (COSHH).

 

COSHH is a useful tool of good management which sets seven basic measures that employers, and sometimes employees, must take. These are set out in this leaflet in a simple step by step approach which will help you to assess risks, implement any measures needed to control exposure and establish good working practices.

 

This leaflet is written mainly for employers to help them meet their specific duties under COSHH. But it will also be useful to safety representatives, health and safety professionals and anyone interested in health and safety issues.

 

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INDG139 (rev1) 07/11 Using electric storage batteries safely

INDG 139 (rev1) 07/11 Using electric storage batteries safely

Every year, at least 25 people are seriously injured when using batteries at work. If you or your staff work with large batteries, this booklet is for you. It gives a basic introduction to working safely with batteries and minimising the risks involved.

 

INDG139 (rev1) 05/06 Using electric storage batteries safely

INDG 139 (rev1) 05/06 Using electric storage batteries safely

See description for reprinted version 07/11 above

 

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INDG140 (rev1) 05/13 Control of exposure to grain dust

INDG 140 (rev1) 05/13 Control of exposure to grain dust

Introduction

Grain dust can affect your health. This guidance tells you about:

 

>  where you might be exposed to grain dust at work;

>  health problems that may occur if you are exposed to grain dust;

>  what your employer should do to protect your health;

>  precautions you should take.

What is grain dust?

Grain dust is the dust produced from the harvesting, drying, handling, storage or processing of barley, wheat, oats, maize or rye and includes any contaminants or additives within the dust.

 

Also see:

EH44 Dust in the workplace General principles of protection

EH44 Dust in the workplace General principles of protection

Introduction

1 This environmental hygiene guidance note describes how to control exposure to dust at work to avoid ill health. It will help you understand what you need to do to comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH) and gives advice on the precautions that may be needed to prevent or adequately control exposure.

 

2 It does not deal with the fire or explosion hazards which some dusts present. Exposure to lead and asbestos and exposure to dust in mines is also not covered in this guidance.

 

3 This guidance is aimed at employers and managers, but employees, health

and safety representatives and health and safety professionals may also find it useful. 

 

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INDG141 (rev1) 02/99 Reporting incidents of exposure to pesticides and veterinary medicines

INDG 141 (rev1) 02/99 Reporting incidents of exposure to pesticides and veterinary medicines

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

What to do if you think people, animals or the environment have been harmed by exposure to pesticides or veterinary medicines.

 

If you think you have been harmed by exposure to pesticides or veterinary medicines you ought to report it. Also, if you know of a case in which other people, animals or the environment have been harmed you ought to report it, unless someone else has already done so. It is important to report the incident as quickly as possible.

 

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INDG143 (rev4) 01/20 Manual Handling

INDG 143 (rev4) 01/20 Manual Handling

Getting to Grips With

As an employer, you must protect your workers from the risk of injury and ill health from hazardous manual handling tasks in the workplace. This leaflet will help you do that. It includes simple risk filters to help you identify which manual handling activities are hazardous.

 

Manual handling means transporting or supporting a load by hand or bodily force. It includes lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling, moving or carrying a load. A load is a moveable object, such as a box or package, a person or an animal, or something being pushed or pulled, such as a roll cage or pallet truck.

 

The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, as amended in 2002 (‘the Regulations’) apply to a wide range of manual handling activities, including lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or carrying. The load may be either animate, such as a person or an animal, or inanimate, such as a box or a trolley.

 

INDG143 (rev3) 11/12 Manual handling at work

INDG 143 (rev3) 11/12 Manual handling at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet describes what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees from the risk of injury through manual handling tasks in the workplace. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

 

The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, as amended in 2002 (‘the Regulations’) apply to a wide range of manual handling activities, including lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or carrying. The load may be either animate, such as a person or an animal, or inanimate, such as a box or a trolley.

 

INDG143 (rev2) 04/06 Getting to grips with manual handling

INDG 143 (rev2) 04/06 Getting to grips with manual handling

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

This booklet explains the problems associated with manual handling and sets out best practice in dealing with them. The advice is intended for managers of small firms or similar organisations. But the general principles are relevant to all workplaces, whatever their size. Avoiding injuries from manual handling makes sound business sense.

 

The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, as amended in 2002 (‘the Regulations’) apply to a wide range of manual handling activities, including lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or carrying. The load may be either inanimate - such as a box or a trolley, or animate - a person or an animal. This guidance gives useful practical advice for employers, managers, safety representatives and individual employees on how to reduce the risk of injury from manual handling.

 

INDG143 (rev1) 07/00 Getting to grips with manual handling

INDG 143 (rev1) 07/00 Getting to grips with manual handling

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

This booklet explains the problems associated with manual handling and sets out best practice approaches to dealing with it. The advice is intended for managers of small firms or organisations. But many of the general principles are relevant to all organisations whatever their size. It makes sound business sense to have good health and safety practices.

 

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INDG145 Watch your back

INDG 145 09/11 Watch your back

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

See description version 02/07 below

 

INDG145 Watch your back

INDG 145 02/07 Watch your back

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

BACK STRAIN

How will it affect me?

Almost anyone can suffer from back strain, but people who handle timber and work with chainsaws are more prone than most. Just because you're young and fit doesn't mean you won't suffer from back pain later on in life. It could affect your job and your social life.

What is back strain?

When we say strain what we really mean is injury. That can involve damage to your muscles, to the ligaments which bind the bones in your back, or to the discs which separate them.

 

The most common type of injury is damage to the muscles and ligaments. Although temporary, the pain can be intense and prolonged.

 

However the longer you mistreat your back the more likely you are to suffer a 'slipped' or prolapsed disc. The disc gets squeezed out from between the bones and presses on your spinal nerves. The result is sciatica - severe, long term pain extending right down into the leg.

 

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INDG147 07/19 Keep your top on

INDG 147 07/19 Keep your top on

Health risks from working in the sun Advice for outdoor workers from the Health and Safety Executive and the Health Departments in England, Scotland and Wales.

 

INDG147 03/07 Keep your top on

INDG 147 03/07 Keep your top on

Advice for outdoor workers from the Health and Safety Executive and the Health Departments in England, Scotland and Wales.

 

A sunny day makes most of us feel good, but too much sunlight can be hard on the skin. It is not simply sudden exposure while on holiday that is harmful. Even a tan that has been built up gradually can be harmful to health. A tan is a sign that the skin has been damaged.

 

The problem is caused by the ultraviolet (UV) rays in sunlight. People whose job keeps them outdoors for a long time, such as farm or building site workers, market gardeners, outdoor activity workers and some public service workers could get more sun on their skin than is healthy for them. Such people can be at greater risk of skin cancer. This leaflet provides some basic information to help you protect yourself.

 

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INDG148 03/02 Reversing Vehicles

INDG 148 03/02 Reversing Vehicles

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

DO YOU USE VEHICLES IN YOUR BUSINESS?

Nearly a quarter of all deaths involving vehicles at work occur while the vehicle is reversing. Many more accidents do not result in injury but cause costly damage to vehicles, equipment and premises. Most of these accidents happen at low speeds and could be prevented by taking some simple safety precautions.

 

This booklet aims to raise awareness of the dangers caused by reversing vehicles. It gives some practical advice on safety precautions.

 

Advice for road vehicles and specialist off-road vehicles is given in this booklet. These include lift trucks, site dumpers, goods vehicles and any other vehicle that may need to reverse.

 

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INDG163 (rev4) 08/14 Risk Assessment a brief guide

INDG 163 (rev4) 08/14 Risk Assessment a brief guide

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

This leaflet is aimed at employers, managers and others with responsibility for health and safety. It will also be useful to employees and safety representatives.

 

As part of managing the health and safety of your business, you must control the risks in your workplace. To do this you need to think about what might cause harm to people and decide whether you are taking reasonable steps to prevent that harm.

 

This is known as risk assessment and it is something you are required by law to carry out. If you have fewer than five employees you don’t have to write anything down.

 

A risk assessment is not about creating huge amounts of paperwork, but rather about identifying sensible measures to control the risks in your workplace. You are probably already taking steps to protect your employees, but your risk assessment will help you decide whether you have covered all you need to.

 

Think about how accidents and ill health could happen and concentrate on real risks - those that are most likely and which will cause the most harm.

 

INDG163 (rev3) 06/11 Risk Assessment a brief guide

INDG 163 (rev3) 06/11 Risk Assessment a brief guide

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

This leaflet aims to help you assess health and safety risks in the workplace

A risk assessment is an important step in protecting your workers and your business, as well as complying with the law. It helps you focus on the risks that really matter in your workplace – the ones with the potential to cause real harm.  In many instances, straightforward measures can readily control risks, for example ensuring spillages are cleaned up promptly so people do not slip, or cupboard drawers are kept closed to ensure people do not trip. For most, that means simple, cheap and effective measures to ensure your most valuable asset – your workforce is protected.

 

The law does not expect you to eliminate all risk, but you are required to protect people as far as ‘reasonably practicable’. This guide tells you how to achieve that with a minimum of fuss.

 

This is not the only way to do a risk assessment, there are other methods that work well, particularly for more complex risks and circumstances. However, we believe this method is the most straightforward for most organisations.

 

INDG163 (rev2) 06/06 Risk Assessment a brief guide

INDG 163 (rev2) 06/06 Risk Assessment a brief guide

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

See edition three description...

 

INDG163 (rev1) 07/03 Risk Assessment a brief guide

INDG 163 (rev1) 07/03 Risk Assessment a brief guide

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

This leaflet aims to help employers and self-employed people to assess risks in the workplace. It is aimed at firms in the commercial, service and light industrial sectors

 

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INDG171 (rev3) 01/20 Managing upper limb disorders in the workplace

INDG 171 (rev3) 01/20 Managing upper limb disorders in the workplace

Introduction

As an employer, you need to protect your workers from the risk of injury and ill health from upper limb disorders (ULDs) in the workplace.

 

ULDs include aches and pains in the shoulders, arms, wrists, hands and fingers, as well as in the neck. They are widespread across a range of industries and jobs, for example on assembly lines, in construction, in meat or poultry processing, and in work with computers. They can be caused or made worse by work.

What does the law say?

As an employer, you have general duties under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act and the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations to assess, control and manage the risks associated with work-related ULDs. This leaflet will help you comply with these duties. For more detailed information, look at HSE’s guidance booklet HSG60 Upper limb disorders in the workplace.

 

INDG171 (rev2) 08/13 Managing upper limb disorders in the workplace

INDG 171 (rev2) 08/13 Managing upper limb disorders in the workplace

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

This brief guide describes what you, as an employer, need to do to protect your employees from the risk of injury and ill health from upper limb disorders (ULDs) in the workplace. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

What are ULDs?

ULDs are conditions which affect the muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves or other soft tissues and joints in the upper limbs such as the neck, shoulders, arms, wrists, hands and fingers. They are often called repetitive strain injuries (RSI), cumulative trauma disorder or occupational overuse syndrome.

 

ULDs can be caused or made worse by work. In the following pages we explain:

 

>  causes and symptoms;

>  how to assess the risks;

>  what you can do to help manage and control the risks.

 

INDG171 (rev1) 02/03 Aching arms (or RSI) in small businesses

INDG 171 (rev1) 02/03 Aching arms (or RSI) in small businesses

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

Is ill health due to upper limb disorders a problem in your workplace?

 

This booklet is designed to help employers and managers in small businesses to understand Upper Limb Disorders (ULDs), which are often called ‘RSI’ (repetitive strain injury).

 

ULDs can have a bad effect on your business because they are a very common form of ill health caused or made worse by work. A survey carried out in 1995 estimated that in that year, half a million people in Great Britain were suffering from a ULD due to their current or past work. On average, each sufferer took 13 days off work in that year.

 

ULDs can be a serious problem, but it is possible to tackle them effectively by managing the risks. You are more likely to succeed if you tackle them in partnership with your workers.

 

In the following pages we explain:

 

>  what ULDs are;

>  their symptoms;

>  how you can avoid them; and

>  what you can do to help.

 

INDG171 (rev1) 12/05 reprinted Aching arms (or RSI) in small businesses

INDG 171 (rev1) 12/05 reprinted Aching arms (or RSI) in small businesses

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

See first edition description...

 

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INDG172 (rev1) 06/12 Breathe easy

INDG 172 (rev1) 06/12 Breathe easy

A workers’ information card on occupational asthma.

 

This card gives you practical information about occupational asthma. You may meet substances at work which could cause allergies if you breathe them in.

 

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INDG174 (rev2) 06/13 Personal protective equipment (PPE) at work

INDG 174 (rev2) 06/13 Personal protective equipment (PPE) at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This leaflet describes what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees from the risk of injury in the workplace. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

 

Employers have duties concerning the provision and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) at work and the leaflet explains what you need to do to meet the requirements of the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992 (as amended.

 

INDG174 (rev1) 09/03 Personal protective equipment (PPE) at work

INDG 174 (rev1) 09/03 Personal protective equipment (PPE) at work

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

The Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) at Work Regulations 1992 form part of a series of health and safety regulations implementing EC Directives. They replace a number of old and often excessively detailed laws. The effect of the PPE at Work Regulations is to ensure that certain basic duties governing the provision and use of PPE apply to all situations where PPE is required. The Regulations follow sound principles for the effective and economical use of PPE, which all employers should follow. However, many employers are already familiar with these principles, and if they are already applying them in their workplace these Regulations will require them to do little, if

anything, more than they do at present.

 

This leaflet explains what the Regulations require and gives advice on how you can meet these requirements. It is not intended to be a definitive statement of the law.

 

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INDG175 (rev3) 11/12 Vibration : Control the Risks from Hand-arm Vibration

INDG 175 (rev3) 11/12 Vibration : Control the Risks from Hand-arm Vibration

This leaflet explains what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees from the risk of hand-arm vibration. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives. The leaflet will help you identify when exposure to hand-arm vibration may cause harm. It introduces practical steps for controlling the risks and will help you understand what you need to do to comply with the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005 (the Vibration Regulations).

What is hand-arm vibration?

Hand-arm vibration is vibration transmitted into workers' hands and arms. This can come from use of hand-held power tools (such as grinders or road breakers), hand-guided equipment (such as powered lawnmowers or pedestrian controlled floor saws) or by holding materials being worked by hand-fed machines (such as pedestal grinders or forge hammers).

 

INDG175 (rev2) 06/05 Vibration : Control the Risks from Hand-arm Vibration

INDG 175 (rev2) 06/05 Vibration : Control the Risks from Hand-arm Vibration

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Control the risks from hand-arm vibration

Who should read this leaflet?

You should read this leaflet if you are an employer whose business involves regular and frequent use of:

>  hand-held power tools;

>  hand-guided powered equipment;

>  powered machines which process hand-held materials.

 

You may also find the leaflet helpful if you are:

>  an employee, or self-employed person, who uses vibrating equipment;

>  a trade union safety representative or an employee representative.

The leaflet will give you a brief introduction to:

 

>  what hand-arm vibration (HAV) is;

>  the ill health it can cause;

>  what the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005 require you to do;

>  simple things you can do to control the risk;

>  where you can get further information.

 

See HSE leaflet INDG 242(rev1) for guidance on exposure to whole-body vibration.

 

INDG175 (rev1) 08/03 Health risks form hand-arm vibration

INDG 175 (rev1) 08/03 Health risks form hand-arm vibration

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

What is HAV?

HAV is vibration transmitted from work processes into workers1 hands and arms. It can be caused by operating hand-held power tools such as road breakers, hand-guided equipment such as lawn mowers, or by holding materials being processed by machines such as pedestal grinders.

When is it hazardous?

Regular and frequent exposure to high levels of vibration can lead to permanent injury. This is most likely when contact with a vibrating tool or process is a regular part of a person’s job. Occasional exposure is unlikely to cause injury, although it should be avoided by people with medical conditions such as Raynaud's Disease.

 

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INDG177 (rev2) 11/13 Gamekeeping and deer farming

INDG 177 (rev2) 11/13 Gamekeeping and deer farming

Introduction

This guidance is for employers and others whose work involves moorland and lowland gamekeeping (including deer stalking and the work of water bailiffs and ghillies) and deer farming. For simplicity, the term ‘gamekeeping’ is used to cover all gamekeeping activities.

 

For ease of use, this guidance is divided into advice, which is likely to be relevant to all of those involved in the activities covered by this publication, and topic specific guidance, covering the areas of gamekeeping and deer farming.

 

Employers should remember they may be responsible for the health and safety of someone who is self-employed for tax and National Insurance purposes, but who works under their control and direction.

 

If you are an employee you must co-operate with your employer on health and safety matters and take reasonable care, not just for your own health and safety but also for that of anyone else who may be put at risk by your work.

 

INDG177 (rev1) 05/02 Gamekeeping and deer farming

INDG 177 (rev1) 05/02 Gamekeeping and deer farming

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

Introduction

This booklet covers moorland and lowland gamekeeping, deer stalking and the work of water bailiffs and ghillies - for simplicity the term ‘gamekeeping’ is used. It gives basic practical advice on health and safety but it is not a substitute for proper instruction and training, or an exact interpretation of the law. However, following this advice will help ensure you meet your legal obligations under relevant health and safety legislation

 

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INDG178 (rev2) 11/12 Written schemes of examination

INDG 178 (rev2) 11/12 Written schemes of examination

Under the Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000, users and owners of pressure systems are required to demonstrate that they know the safe operating limits (principally pressure and temperature) of their systems, and that they are safe under those conditions.

 

They need to ensure that a suitable written scheme of examination is in place before the system is operated. They also need to ensure that the system is actually examined in accordance with the written scheme of examination.

 

This publication complements the HSE leaflet Pressure systems: A brief guide to safety. It provides guidance on drafting written schemes of examination, but it cannot cover all relevant aspects of the Regulations.

 

The 'Find out more' section at the end of the leaflet lists detailed guidance.

 

INDG178 (rev1) 02/02 Written schemes of examination

INDG 178 (rev1) 02/02 Written schemes of examination

The Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000 came into force on 21 February 2000. Users and owners of pressure systems are required to demonstrate that they know the safe operating limits, principally pressure and temperature, of their pressure systems, and that the systems are safe under those conditions. They need to ensure that a suitable written scheme of examination is in place before the system is operated. They also need to ensure that the pressure system is actually examined in accordance with the written scheme of examination.

 

This document complements the free HSE leaflet Pressure systems: Safety and you. It provides guidance on drafting written schemes of examination, but it cannot cover all relevant aspects of the Regulations. The ‘Further information’ section at the end of the document lists more detailed guidance, or you can contact your local Health and Safety Executive office or Local Authority Environmental Health

Department.

 

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INDG185 (rev3) 01/13 Using tractors safely

INDG 185 (rev3) 01/13 Using tractors safely

This step-by-step guide to tractor safety is for everyone who uses a tractor, or tractor-operated machinery. It applies to those working in farming, forestry, horticulture, amenity horticulture and the sports turf industry.

 

Whether you are a student, a regular tractor driver, or an employer, you need to learn about tractor safety before it is too late.

 

People die in tractor accidents every year and there are many major injuries, including amputations and fractures. There are probably other accidents or near misses which HSE never hears about. Simple but essential safety steps would have prevented most of them.

 

This leaflet shows how training in tractor safety could save your life.

 

INDG185 (rev2) 10/09 Using tractors safely

INDG 185 (rev2) 10/09 Using tractors safely

See third edition description...

 

Also see:

 

HSENI 12/21 Using Tractors Safely

HSENI 12/21 Using Tractors Safely

A Step-by-Step Safety Guide

Introduction

Every year across Northern Ireland people are seriously injured and killed in tractor accidents and there are many other accidents and near misses involving tractors which HSENI never hears about. Simple but essential safety measures would have prevented most of these accidents.

 

This step-by-step guide to tractor safety is for everyone who uses a tractor, or tractor-operated machinery. It applies to those working in farming, forestry, horticulture, amenity horticulture and the sports turf industry.

 

Whether you are a student, a regular tractor driver, or an employer, you need to learn about tractor safety.

 

Any person operating a tractor, maintaining a tractor or training a person to operate a tractor must be competent to do so. Being competent means having the necessary knowledge, training and experience to carry out a task successfully and safely.

 

This leaflet explains the steps required to operate a tractor safely and following them could save your life!

 

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INDG189 (rev1) 09/11 Safety zones around oil and gas installations in waters around the UK

INDG 189 (rev1) 09/11 Safety zones around oil and gas installations in waters around the UK

Introduction

This leaflet explains the purpose and significance of safety zones around offshore oil and gas installations and their effect on marine activities, particularly relating to fishing vessels.

 

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INDG197 (rev1) 10/03 Working with sewage - The health hazards: A guide for employees

INDG 197 (rev1) 10/03 Working with sewage - The health hazards: A guide for employees

Are you at risk?

Workers whose activities bring them into contact with sewage and sewage products are at risk of contracting a work-related illness.

 

The majority of illnesses are relatively mild cases of gastroenteritis, but potentially fatal diseases, such as leptospirosis (Weil’s disease) and hepatitis, are also reported to HSE.

 

However, not all cases are reported because people often fail to recognise the link between illness and work.

 

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INDG198 Working with sewage - The health hazards: A guide for employers

INDG 198 09/11 Working with sewage - The health hazards: A guide for employers

Introduction

Several work activities bring workers into contact with sewage and sewage products.

 

Each year, some workers will suffer from at least one episode of work-related illness.

 

The majority of illnesses are relatively mild cases of gastroenteritis, but potentially fatal diseases, such as leptospirosis (Weil’s disease) and hepatitis, are also reported to HSE.

 

However, there could well be significant under-reporting of cases because there is often failure to recognise the link between illness and work.

 

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INDG199 (rev2) 05/13 Workplace transport safety

INDG 199 (rev2) 05/13 Workplace transport safety

Introduction

Every year, there are over 5000 accidents involving transport in the workplace. About 50 of these result in people being killed (www.hse.gov.uk/statistics).

 

The main causes of injury are people falling off vehicles, or being struck or crushed by them.

 

This guidance has been produced by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to help people involved in workplace transport reduce the chances of accidents happening.

 

It is mainly aimed at managers but operators and their safety representatives will also find it useful.

 

Employers have a legal duty to ensure that the health and safety of their employees, contractors and members of the public are not put at risk as a result of the work they do. Employees and the self-employed also have a duty to look after their own health and safety and that of anyone who might be affected by their work.

 

INDG199 (rev1) 11/05 Workplace transport safety

INDG 199 (rev1) 11/05 Workplace transport safety

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

Every year, a significant number of people are killed by accidents involving vehicles in the workplace, and many more people are injured. A lot of damage is also done to property and profit. Better planning, training and awareness, and the appropriate use of vehicles, can avoid most of these accidents.

 

This guidance has been produced by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to help people involved in transport in the workplace reduce the chances of accidents happening. It is aimed at both managers and operators and identifies some of the safety problems for common vehicle operations. More detailed information can be found in Workplace transport safety: An employers’ guide HSG136.

 

INDG199 (rev1) 05/02 Managing vehicles safely at the workplace

INDG 199 (rev1) 05/02 Managing vehicles safely at the workplace

 (withdrawn - archive copy)

 

This leaflet is addressed to you as an employer. It offers simple advice and guidance to help you ensure that vehicle movements at the workplace, and activities such as loading, maintenance etc are carried out safely.

 

It applies to any vehicle or piece of mobile equipment which is used by employers, employees, self-employed people or visitors in any work setting (apart from travelling on public roads). This covers a very wide range of familiar vehicles, for example cars and vans, lift trucks, heavy goods vehicles, dumpers etc, as well as less common vehicles and plant.

 

The leaflet should be useful for all workplaces where vehicles are used. For workplaces such as construction sites, quarries, farms, forestry operations etc, you should refer to specific guidance on dealing with the particular conditions and hazards in these industries (see page 12 for details).

 

Also see:

HSG 136 - Workplace transport safety: An employers' guide

HSG 144 - The safe use of vehicles on construction sites

INDG 413 - Preventing falls from vehicles

 

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