INDG H&S Guides p1

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Useful INDG Health and Safety Guides - page 1


 

TIRA - Health and Safety Risk Assessment Software

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Small Business Health and Safety Risk Assessment Software

 

Health and Safety Executive

 

INDG is an abbreviation of Industry Guidance

 

Health and Safety INDG 36 to INDG 175

Health & Safety Law - What you should know

Health & Safety Law - What you should know

 

All workers have a right to work in places where risks to their health and safety are properly controlled. Health and safety is about stopping you getting hurt at work or ill through work. Your employer is responsible for health and safety, but you must help.

 

INDG 36 - DSE : Working with VDU's

INDG 36 - DSE : Working with VDU's

 

This leaflet will help you to comply with the Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 and explains what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees from any risks associated with Display Screen Equipment (DSE) (ie computers and laptops). It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

 

INDG 69 - Violence at Work

INDG 69 - Violence at Work

 

People who deal directly with the public may face aggressive or violent behaviour. They may be sworn at, threatened or even attacked.

 

This document gives practical advice to help you find out if violence is a problem for your employees, and if it is, how to tackle it. The advice is aimed at employers, but should also interest employees and safety  representatives. 

 

INDG 73 - Lone Working

INDG 73 - Lone Working: Health and safety guidance on the risks of lone working -

 

This leaflet provides guidance on how to keep lone workers healthy and safe. It is aimed at anyone who employs or engages lone workers, and also at self-employed people who work alone.

 

Following the guidance in the leaflet is not compulsory, but it should help employers understand what they need to do to comply with their legal duties towards lone workers under:

 

the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974;

the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

 

INDG 90 - Ergonomics and human factors

INDG 90 - Ergonomics and human factors

 

This leaflet is aimed at employers, managers and others and will help you understand ergonomics and human factors in the workplace. It gives some examples of ergonomics problems and simple, effective advice about how to solve them.

 

You may have heard the term ‘ergonomics’. In some industries, such as major hazards, defence and transport, ergonomics is also called ‘human factors’. This leaflet helps to explain how applying ergonomics can improve health and safety in your workplace.

 

Ergonomics is a science concerned with the ‘fit’ between people and their work. It puts people first, taking account of their capabilities and limitations. Ergonomics aims to make sure that tasks, equipment, information and the environment fit each worker.

 

INDG 91 - Drug Misuse at Work:  A Guide of Employers

INDG 91 - Drug Misuse at Work:  A Guide of Employers

 

This booklet has been developed by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the Home Office, the Department of Health, the Scottish Executive, the Health Education Board for Scotland, the National Assembly for Wales, the Health and Safety Executive Northern Ireland and other organisations. It will help owners and managers of businesses and other organisations, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises, deal with drug-related problems at work.

 

It provides a basic understanding of the signs, effects and risks of drug misuse. It also sets out a best practice approach to dealing with drug-related problems at work.

 

INDG 136 - Working with substances hazardous to health : A Brief Guide to COSHH

INDG 136 - Working with substances hazardous to health : A Brief Guide to COSHH

 

This leaflet describes how to control hazardous substances at work, so they do not cause ill health. It will help you understand what you need to do to comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002 (as amended) which apply to the way you work with these substances.

 

This leaflet provides measures that you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees from hazardous substances at work. It will also be useful to employees and their safety representatives.

 

Why do I need to read this leaflet?

 

Every year, thousands of workers are made ill by hazardous substances, contracting lung disease such as asthma, cancer and skin disease such as dermatitis. These diseases cost many millions of pounds each year to:

 

industry, to replace the trained worker;

society, in disability allowances and medicines; and

individuals, who may lose their jobs.

 

INDG 143 - Manual Handling : Getting to Grips With

INDG 143 - Manual Handling : Getting to Grips With

 

This leaflet describes what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees from the risk of injury through manual handling tasks in the workplace. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

 

The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, as amended in 2002 (‘the Regulations’) apply to a wide range of manual handling activities, including lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or carrying. The load may be either animate, such as a person or an animal, or inanimate, such as a box or a trolley.

 

INDG 163 - Risk Assessment a brief guide

INDG 163 - Risk Assessment a brief guide

 

This leaflet is aimed at employers, managers and others with responsibility for health and safety. It will also be useful to employees and safety representatives.

 

As part of managing the health and safety of your business, you must control the risks in your workplace. To do this you need to think about what might cause harm to people and decide whether you are taking reasonable steps to prevent that harm.

 

This is known as risk assessment and it is something you are required by law to carry out. If you have fewer than five employees you don’t have to write anything down.

 

A risk assessment is not about creating huge amounts of paperwork, but rather about identifying sensible measures to control the risks in your workplace. You are probably already taking steps to protect your employees, but your risk assessment will help you decide whether you have covered al you need to.

 

Think about how accidents and ill health could happen and concentrate on real risks - those that are most likely and which will cause the most harm.

 

INDG 175 - Vibration : Control the Risks from Hand-arm Vibration

INDG 175 - Vibration : Control the Risks from Hand-arm Vibration

 

This leaflet explains what you, as an employer, may need to do to protect your employees from the risk of hand-arm vibration. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives. The leaflet will help you identify when exposure to hand-arm vibration may cause harm. It introduces practical steps for controlling the risks and will help you understand what you need to do to comply with the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005 (the Vibration Regulations).

 

What is hand-arm vibration?

 

Hand-arm vibration is vibration transmitted into workers' hands and arms. This can come from use of hand-held power tools (such as grinders or road breakers), hand-guided equipment (such as powered lawnmowers or pedestrian controlled floor saws) or by holding materials being worked by hand-fed machines (such as pedestal grinders or forge hammers).

 

INDG 171 - Managing upper limb disorders in the workplace

 

This brief guide describes what you, as an employer, need to do to protect your

 

employees from the risk of injury and ill health from upper limb disorders (ULDs) in the workplace. It will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

 

What are ULDs?

 

ULDs are conditions which affect the muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves or other soft tissues and joints in the upper limbs such as the neck, shoulders, arms, wrists, hands and fingers. They are often called repetitive strain injuries (RSI), cumulative trauma disorder or occupational overuse syndrome.

 

ULDs can be caused or made worse by work. In the following pages we explain:

 

causes and symptoms;

how to assess the risks;

what you can do to help manage and control the risks.


On Safe Lines QHSE Software Help file v1.109.0184 : Copyright © 2019 Brian G. Welch MSc(QHSE), NVQ4(OH&S), CMIOSH


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